News Coverage

Technology is transforming the booking process for travelers of all kinds, from the regimented planners to the last-minute nomads, according to a study from the CMO Council. “What’s Changing the Way You Travel Today,” conducted by the CMO Council’s GeoBranding Center and AIG Travel, finds that leisure travelers are more-informed and better-prepared than ever before.

More than 51 percent of travelers say great deals and discounts are what prompts them to make a travel booking, according to new research by the CMO Council’s GeoBranding Center and AIG Travel. The report, “What’s Changing the Way You Travel Today,” delves into the way in which beliefs, values and interest, as well as new technology and service innovations, are changing the travel landscape.

GeoBranding Center and AIG Travel's findings around the relatively low influence social media plays in affecting travel planning decisions stands out, especially as visually-driven platforms like Instagram have become more popular with consumers. Travel marketers should still put an emphasis on digital, per the survey results, but older tactics like deals and discounts clearly still prove a strong draw in making a purchase, along with personalized online experiences. 

New CMO Council Study Reveals the Impact of Technology on Travel Intention, Selection and Timing

As pressure mounts on marketers to expand their expertise beyond traditional brand, marketing and media benchmarks, the US-based senior vice-president of marketing at CMO Council, Liz Miller, says there are early signs of a swing away from marketing talent with deep data science capabilities in favour of those who can blend financial management with storytelling.

According to new research – entitled "What's Changing the Way You Travel Today" – undertaken by the CMO Council's GeoBranding Center and AIG Travel, today's diverse leisure travelers are smarter, more informed and better prepared than ever before. Beliefs, values and interests are influencing where, how and why people travel. Technology and service innovations are making it easier and cheaper to discover, reach and enjoy travel destinations.  While deals, specials and promotions are driving desire and action, visually enriched and personalized digital content channels are making travel experiences more alluring and exciting.

“What’s Changing the Way You Travel Today,” conducted by the CMO Council’s GeoBranding Center and AIG Travel, finds that leisure travelers are more-informed and better-prepared than ever before.

According to new research from the CMO Council and Deloitte sheds light on the changing role of the CMO from chief brand build and storyteller to chief growth officer.  But what does it take for a Chief Marketing Officer to make the transition from their traditional role to take on new goals?

GDPR is a wakeup call to marketing and beyond – and not just those with business ties to Europe. Barb Mosher Zinck muses on fresh data from the CMO Council and looks at where we go from here.

The CMO Council leveraged insights to create 5 key plays all growth-driving CMOs should have in their strategic playbook. These growth leaders stem from a combination of newer brands experiencing rapid growth, as well as more established brands that are leveraging unique marketing-led strategies to drive new routes to revenue. 

When it comes to key skills driving the growth agenda, CGOs put more emphasis on data and intelligence analysis and market insights and knowledge, where CMOs key in on storytelling in a digital world and brand building. Both leaders place a holistic view of CX as a key skill to drive growth.

According to the CMO Council, marketers 'plays' – common goals, mandates and approaches – provide a glimpse of how today’s marketing vanguard is helping advance the growth agenda and reshape the role of the modern CMO.

A survey conducted in the third quarter of 2018 on a sample of 227 senior marketing managers from  CMO Council and SAP  shows that more than half of the respondents will no longer use the so-called "behavioral data" of users collected from browser browsing and historical research on search engines online, so as not to run the risk of incurring violations of the GDPR .

In a Q3 2018 survey of 227 senior marketing executives worldwide conducted by CMO Council and SAP, 54% of respondents said they anticipate that they’ll no longer be able to use behavioral data like web browsing data and search histories if they want to stay compliant with the GDPR.

  According to data from the CMO Council, in partnership with SAP Customer Experience, marketers from organisations who took the lead in preparing to meet and exceed GDPR data standards noted increased trust and engagement levels with customers. Here's what the data has revealed.

An analysis, prepared by the CMO Council and SAP, has asked what types of data marketers take for granted that they will lose because of the regulations. Marketing managers are quite clear about what will begin to disappear from their list of useful information.

CMO Council Study Points to Opportunities, Responsibilities and the Realities of Customer Data Protection and Customer Engagement in a Post-GDPR World. 

In a Q3 2018 survey of 227 senior marketing executives worldwide conducted by CMO Council and SAP, 54% of respondents said they anticipate that they’ll no longer be able to use behavioral data like web browsing data and search histories if they want to stay compliant with the GDPR. About half indicated that third-party data and email addresses may not be safe to use under GDPR.

  According to data from the CMO Council and SAP Customer Experience, brands that prepared to meet GDPR data standards, which went into effect on May 25th, noted increased trust and engagement levels with customers. Respondents to the CMO-SAP survey agreed that the implementation of GDPR standards reinforced brands’ responsibility to protect customer data, but more successful organizations seized this responsibility to create optimized experiences.

What are the most exposed data to the new GDPR standards in digital marketing? A survey conducted in the third quarter of 2018 on a sample of 227 senior marketing managers from  CMO Council  and  SAP  shows that 54% of those interviewed will no longer use the so-called "user behavioral data" collected from browser browsing and research on online search engines to avoid the risk of incurring GDPR violations.